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The Allen Broussard Conservancy by Margaret Broussard

The Allen Broussard Conservancy is named for our son, Allen David Broussard (1961-1990), who was a Wildlife Biologist and Ecologist. Allen died four days after his 29th birthday, of infection following a heart transplant. At the time, he was in a Doctoral program at the University of Illinois. His heart had been damaged as a result of the year-long radiotherapy and chemotherapy he had undergone to cure him of Hodgkin's' Disease diagnosed when he was 19 years old.

Allen had a pleasant, cheerful personality and a charming sense of humor. Called "Smiley" as a little boy because of his friendly smile, he liked everybody and was fun to be around. Girls thought he was cute, boys liked his humor and teachers liked his eagerness and participation. He accepted popularity without self-consciousness or conceit. It was a joke around the Ecology Department at the University of Illinois that Allen had increased the enrollment of girls many-fold as a Graduate Assistant teaching Freshman Biology labs.

From his infancy, Allen had shown a strong interest in Nature. Even as a pre-schooler, he had learned things from observation which most adults do not know, about the habits and characteristics of animals. He was an official counter for The Audubon Society's Christmas Counts while still a pre-teen because his observations were so trustworthy. Fellow Boy Scouts also found him a reliable source of information and sometimes called him "Nature Boy." As a teen-age surfer and water skier, he had opportunities to observe living things in the water, sometimes eating little things he found in floating seaweed (sushi!) or cooking fish on the islands in the Indian River. He was, without even realizing it, constantly exercising his unique ability, not just to observe, but to understand the workings of nature.

We knew Allen was unusually good at nature, but it wasn't until a camping/backpacking trip we took to Alaska the summer he graduated from High School that we began to realize how truly talented he was. Every day brought new instances of his teaching us about things we were able to see only after he pointed them out to us - the differing habits of different species of salmon spawning in a stream, interpretations of different animal tracks in the mud, tiny dots on a distant mountainside that he knew were Dall sheep, eagles, moose, bear, caribou - things we would never have seen without him. That trip defined for him what he was, and what he wanted to do with his life.

After a two year break during which he was treated for his cancer, Allen was anxious to get to college at Colorado State, about whose exemplary wildlife program he had heard. He started off with straight A's and graduated with honors from their Wildlife Management school. He wanted to do field research and later go to graduate school and become a college professor. Already recognized as an able field biologist, he was able to get into some serious research projects right away, first with sage grouse in Northwest Colorado and then with a reclusive wading bird called the Yuma clapper rail in a Colorado River marsh bordering Lake Havasu.

It was in Lake Havasu City, Arizona, that he had a near-fatal heart attack, an entirely unexpected side effect of his almost-forgotten radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. At a hospital in Phoenix, we were told he needed a heart transplant, but that they couldn't do it there. Back he had to go to Stanford, where he had been operated on and treated for Hodgkin's Disease six years earlier. The Stanford heart surgeons patched up his heart enough to postpone the transplant a few years - long enough, we hoped, for him to finish graduate school and for heart science to be refined to the point that other surgery could be used instead of a transplant, with all its risks of rejection, etc. Sadly, that was not to be.

After Allen's death, one of his colleagues, Dr. Rob Deblinger, wrote: "It's only once in a long while that I meet someone who is so gifted. Allen had that rare talent to take lots of seemingly unrelated information and synthesize it into a workable hypothesis. Soon after came an ecological concept and finally a theory. I can't tell you how many Broussard's Theories of Wildlife Biology there are. I used to listen to him talk and talk, digesting and positioning facts until it all made sense. Then he would say, 'And if that is so, what we used to think about in this way is really like this...' and so on and so forth. What a great mind. There is no doubt that Allen would have made a great ecologist."

- Margaret Broussard


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Help Make Allen's Conservation Dream a Reality


Together, we can make Allen’s dream of conserving Florida’s wilderness a reality.  To join or for additional information about the benefits of membership in the Allen Broussard Conservancy, Please email: ABConservancy@ForeverFlorida.com


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Follow the site instructions and enter Allen Broussard Conservancy as your charity of choice.  Thank you for your support.

 
 
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